AOC Agon AG241QG & AG241QX review: remarkable gaming monitors

Modest size, grand specs

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AOC Agon AG241QG & AG241QX

If you place the AOC Agon AG241QG and the AG241QX next to each other you have to look closely to find the differences. At first glance the monitors are identical. The same metal base, on which the panel can turn, tilt, rotate and change in height. The same metal finish at the back, the integrated handle, the retractable headphone stand and the characteristic wired remote control which allows you to change to a different preset without having to use the on-screen menu. 

AOC AGON AG241QX

Both also offer a slider on the base that allows you to show how high the monitor is - this means you can put it back to that same height after it has been moved. To be frank this is kind of a gimmick, but we see this feature more often. The possibility to quickly charge a smartphone or tablet via one of the usb-connectors is more useful in our opinion - and fortunately both monitors have this functionality. 

AOC AGON AG241QX
This is quite useful

We only start seeing differences when taking a closer look at the connectivity. The AG241QX offers displayport, hdmi (with mhl-support), dvi and vga. Aside from that we find audio in- and outputs as well as an integrated usb 3.0 hub. Built-in speakers are also present. 

  • AOC AGON AG241QX
  • AOC AGON AG241QX
  • AOC AGON AG241QX

Because of the G-Sync scaler, the AG241QG has less inputs. Here we find hdmi and displayport, plus audio in- and outputs, a usb 3.0 hub and speakers. Vga, dvi and mhl are not present here. 

  • AOC AGON AG241QG
  • AOC AGON AG241QG
  • AOC AGON AG241QG
 

To be clear: the AG241QX is compatible with Freesync-compatible graphics cards (de facto, AMD models), the AG241QG can only synchronize the refresh rate with G-sync suited cards, or Nvidia ones. With the former the Freesync-range is 30-144Hz, for the latter the G-sync range is 30-165Hz. The AG241QG also offers the possibility to reduce motion blur in the form of ULMB. This cannot be used at the same time as G-sync (as is always the case). 

The monitors are the same in every other regard, both based on a 23.8 inch 2560x1440 pixels tn-panel, with a pixel density of 123 ppi. This is slightly more than the 110 ppi that you would find on a 27 monitor with this resolution, which means that without software scaling the control sin Windows-applications might be too small. However, in our opinion, it is still easy to work with. For example: the pixels and with that the controls on an ultra hd 28-inch monitor are clearly smaller. 

The panel has a bezel that is not extraordinarily big, but still visible. AOC presumably chose a bigger frame deliberately: when transporting the monitor this offers more protection than a model without bezel as is trendy with many monitors nowadays. 

All in all we can state that both monitors come across as pleasantly solid and in terms of inputs they offer what you can expect for their purpose of use. Whether or not you like the design is not a decision we can make, but it is certainly in line with the rest of the monitors in this market. 


Compare

two products discussed in this review

  Product Lowest price

AOC AGON AG241QG

23.8 inch, 2560x1440, 123 ppi, TN, Nvidia G-Sync, 165 Hz, HDMI input, DisplayPort input, 1 ms, 350 cd/m², 1000 : 1

Specifications Test results Reviews Prices

£419.99

Avg. £449.99
7 shops, 3x stock

AOC AGON AG241QX

23.8 inch, 2560x1440, 123 ppi, TN, AMD FreeSync, 144 Hz, DVI input, HDMI input, DisplayPort input, 1 ms, 350 cd/m², 1000 : 1

Specifications Test results Reviews Prices

£334.28

Avg. £358.32
3 shops, 2x stock

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